Drinking water in Nigeria is not available to people who have not been diagnosed with a blood group condition, but the man who owns the water bottle said he has received no complaints.

The Nigerian Civil Defence (KFCN) confirmed that the bottle had been handed out by a woman in the city of Lagos.

The woman said the bottle was handed out on the streets of the city’s southern town of Kano after the water supply was cut in the wake of the country’s devastating floods in October.

Drinking water in Africa is not currently available to those who have blood groups A woman said she had received a bottle of water from a man in Lagos on October 30, after a local man in the town of Gombe handed her a water container.

“I told her I didn’t have blood type, but she insisted,” she told The Local.

She said she was then asked to drink water from the container.

“I drank the water and was surprised to see the colour of the water,” she said.

The woman said that after drinking the water, she returned the bottle to the man.

‘I don’t have any problem’A KFCN spokesperson told The Australian that the man had been given the water by an employee of the local branch of the organisation, but he declined to say what the employee had said.

The spokesperson said the organisation was aware of the incident and that it was investigating the situation.

Nigeria has one of the world’s highest rates of cases of blood group A, which is known as a blood grouping and is considered to be the most common of the blood group.

Blood group A has been linked to a range of serious health issues including high blood pressure, kidney problems, high cholesterol, high blood sugar and blood clots.

In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that Nigeria is currently facing the “highest rates of the ABO blood group worldwide”.

In the first four months of the year, there were more than 14,000 cases of ABO-positive people in the country, the WHO said.KFCD is one of many organisations which distribute water in the Niger Delta.

ABC/ReutersTopics:health,environment,nigeria,human-interest,health-policy,health,nsw