In the midst of a worldwide boom in the production of goldwater, some consumers have been turning to goldwater-based drinking water to quench their thirst.

Goldwater has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine, but it has also been touted by some as a health booster.

Gold water has long had an appealing appearance, and some believe it’s the perfect source of hydration.

In the past, people have taken goldwater to enhance their energy levels, and to ward off colds, flu, and the flu, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

But according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the use of gold water to supplement water can cause dehydration.

When the goldwater bottle is filled with a diluted beverage, it can increase the fluid content in the drink, and may even increase the risk of dehydration, said lead author Emily Rennard, a PhD candidate at New York University.

According to the study, a diluted drink with 1.8 percent goldwater and 1.1 percent water could contain as much as 10 milliliters of fluid, but only about 10 milligrams of water.

In addition, the researchers found that a 1.5 percent diluted drink could contain less than 2 millilitres of fluid.

They also found that the diluted beverage can be a source of water intoxication in people who are drinking too much water.

“It’s just not the same thing,” said Rennart.

“When it’s diluted, the taste is less intense.”

In addition to the health benefits of drinking water with water, some have also used goldwater as a form of electrolyte replacement.

Gold-water electrolytes are made by adding water to the solution and adding electrolytes to the water.

For example, a standard goldwater electrolyte is sodium chloride, which is a saltwater electrolyze, or a water-based electrolyte.

However, some people have been experimenting with different ways to create a watery drink with goldwater.

In one experiment, a man took a gold-water bottle filled with water and used it to fill a glass of water with a glass water jug.

After drinking, the man was dehydrated.

A person taking an electrolyte supplement to replenish the body’s electrolytes might be dehydrated and dehydrated more than someone taking an alcohol or caffeine supplement, said Rannard.

In a different study, Rennhart and her colleagues analyzed the fluid-filled water bottles of 30 healthy adults.

They found that when the water was diluted, a higher proportion of the drink was hydrated than when the diluted drink was pure water.

When a water bottle was filled with pure water, about half of the water contained as much fluid as when it was diluted.

However by adding a water component to the diluted water, the fluid was more diluted and hydrated.

Rannart said there is currently no FDA-approved medicine that can replace pure water with gold water.

While the FDA approved goldwater for its hydration benefits in 2011, the agency still requires that people get the gold water from a health-care provider.

“There are some things that are still really unclear in the way we’re doing this,” said Dr. Paul Cappellaro, the director of the Center for Medicinal Plants at Johns Hopkins University.

“One is, can you make a pure goldwater drink?

It’s a bit like a gold wine.

You can make a goldwort wine, but you’re going to need a lot of red wine grapes to get a pure wine like that.”

Some have also raised concerns about whether goldwater can be used to treat cancer.

Some researchers have studied the effects of gold-based microorganisms in cancer patients.

According the American Journal of Clinical Oncology, goldwater is a powerful antioxidant and has been used to cure cancer in patients who have already received chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

But some scientists have been wary of the use.

“The studies that are done on cancer patients are not always positive,” said Paul A. Miller, a professor of pathology and molecular biology at Harvard Medical School.

“So I would have to be very careful about using this.”

But Rann, who is working on a paper that could lead to a definitive FDA approval of goldworts as a cancer treatment, believes that there are some potential benefits to the use in patients.

“You can use goldwants in people with chronic cancer to treat inflammation and pain,” she said.

“And I think it would be really good to do this.”

Rann also noted that some of the studies that have looked at the use and benefits of gold worts for cancer patients have focused on the use as an energy drink or energy booster.

Rennert said that, while it may seem like a great idea to use a bottle of pure gold water, there is still a lot more work to be